DIABETES & THYROID RELATED RISK

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We are less aware that lifetime health problems you may have or occur in future due to your genes and your strengths which you are gifted by your parents.Avastu Genetics help you to recognise them and also help you to cure your genetic health problems through counselling, diet and nutrition’s. It is a onetime Investment Program includes 105 Phenotypes tests which will guide to identify your Generic Strength and protect you from your Genetics Problem throughout your life.


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Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong disease that keeps your body from using insulin the way it should. People with type 2 diabetes are said to have insulin resistance. People who are middle-aged or older are most likely to get this kind of diabetes, so it used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But type 2 diabetes also affects kids and teens, mainly because of childhood obesity. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain normal glucose levels.
Symptoms
Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for:
1. Increased thirst
2. Frequent urination
3. Increased hunger
4. Unintended weight loss
5. Fatigue
6. Blurred vision
7. Slow-healing sores
8. Frequent infections
9. Areas of darkened skin, usually in the armpits and neck
Risk factors
Factors that may increase your risk of type 2 diabetes include:
1. Weight
2. Fat distribution
3. Inactivity
4. Family history
5. Race (Although it's unclear why, people of certain races — including black, Hispanic, American Indian and Asian-American people — are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than white people are)
6. Age
7. Prediabetes
8. Gestational diabetes
9. Polycystic ovarian syndrome
10. Areas of darkened skin, usually in the armpits and neck
11. Heart and blood vessel disease
12. Nerve damage (neuropathy)
13. Kidney damage
14. Eye damage
15. Slow healing
16. Hearing impairment
17. Skin conditions
18. Sleep apnea
19. Alzheimer's disease

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Insulin resistance

Insulin resistance is the name given when cells of the body don’t respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin resistance is the driving factor that leads to type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes and prediabetes.
Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity; however, it is possible to be insulin resistant without being overweight or obese. Modern research has shown that insulin resistance can be combatted by treatment methods that reduce how much insulin the body is producing or taking via insulin injections or insulin pumps. Reducing insulin resistance can be achieved by following low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets.
The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. It also means that glucose is more likely to build up in the blood and this can lead to too high blood sugar levels. When the body becomes resistant to insulin, it tries to cope by producing more insulin. People with insulin resistance are often producing too more insulin than healthy people.
Producing too much insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia.
Symptoms
1. A waistline over 40 inches in men and 35 inches in women
2. Blood pressure readings of 130/80 or higher
3. A fasting glucose level over 100 mg/dL
4. A fasting triglyceride level over 150 mg/dL
5. A HDL cholesterol level over under 40 mg/dL in men and 50 mg/dL in women
6. Skin tags
7. Patches of dark, velvety skin called acanthosis nigricans
Risk Factors and Causes
Things that can make this condition more likely include:
1. Obesity, especially belly fat
2. Inactive lifestyle
3. Diet high in carbohydrates
4. Gestational diabetes
5. Health conditions like nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and polycystic ovary syndrome
6. A family history of diabetes
7. Smoking
8. Ethnicity -- it’s more likely if your ancestry is African, Latino, or Native American
9. Age -- it’s more likely after 45
10. Hormonal disorders like Cushing’s syndrome and acromegaly
11. Medications like steroids, antipsychotics, and HIV medications
12. Sleep problems like sleep apnea

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HBA1c Response to Fiber

The term HbA1c refers to glycated hemoglobin. It develops when hemoglobin, a protein within red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body, joins with glucose in the blood, becoming ‘glycated’.
Increased fiber in the diet is associated with a reduction of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), improved lipid profile, and loss of body weight in type 2 diabetes patients. It has been proposed that appropriate consumption of fruit in the diet may be an adequate strategy to reduce HbA1c, given the fiber content, and prevent complications from diabetes.

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Insulin Resistance to Whole Grains

Including whole grains in your meal plan might help improve your body’s sensitivity to insulin, whether you have type 2 diabetes already or are at risk for it. Researchers compared a whole grain diet with one consisting of refined grains—both equal in total carbohydrate—in 14 adults with prediabetes who followed each of the diets for eight weeks at a time. Eating whole grains decreased their resistance to insulin and upped the function of insulin-producing beta cells. Eating whole grains, such as oatmeal and brown rice, instead of refined grains reduces blood glucose and should be part of any strategy to prevent or treat diabetes, the researchers say.

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Type 1 Diabetes Risk

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which your immune system destroys insulin-making cells in your pancreas. These are called Beta cells. The condition is usually diagnosed in children and young people, so it used to be called Juvenile diabetes.
Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms
1. Extreme thirst
2. Increased hunger (especially after eating)
3. Dry mouth
4. Upset stomach and vomiting
5. Frequent urination
6. Unexplained weight loss, even though you’re eating and feel hungry
7. Fatigue
8. Blurry vision
9. Heavy, labored breathing (your doctor may call this Kussmaul respiration)
10. Frequent infections of your skin, urinary tract, or vagina
11. Crankiness or mood changes
12. Bedwetting in a child who’s been dry at night
Signs of an emergency with type 1 diabetes include:
1. Shaking and confusion
2. Rapid breathing
3. Fruity smell to your breath
4. Belly pain
5. Loss of consciousness (rare)
Type 1 Diabetes Complications
1. Cardiovascular disease
2. Skin problems
3. Gum disease
4. Pregnancy problems
5. Retinopathy
6. Kidney damage
7. Poor blood flow and nerve damage

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Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin is a hormone secreted by your pancreas. Its main role is to regulate the amount of nutrients circulating in your bloodstream. Although insulin is mostly implicated in blood sugar management, it also affects fat and protein metabolism. The cells in your pancreas sense this increase and release insulin into your blood. Insulin then travels around your bloodstream, telling your cells to pick up sugar from your blood. This process results in reduced blood sugar levels.
Insulin sensitivity describes how sensitive the body is to the effects of insulin. Someone said to be insulin sensitive will require smaller amounts of insulin to lower blood glucose levels than someone who has low sensitivity.
HOW DOES INSULIN SENSITIVITY AFFECT PEOPLE WITH DIABETES?
People with low insulin sensitivity, also referred to as insulin resistance, will require larger amounts of insulin either from their own pancreas or from injections in order to keep blood glucose stable.
Having insulin resistance is a sign that your body is having difficulty metabolizing glucose, and this can indicate wider health problems such as high blood pressure and cholesterol levels may also be present.
WHY IS INSULIN SENSITIVITY IMPORTANT?
1. Low insulin sensitivity can lead to a variety of health problems. The body will try to compensate for having a low sensitivity to insulin by producing more insulin.
2. However, a high level of circulating insulin (hyperinsulinemia) is associated with damage to blood vessels, high blood pressure, heart disease and heart failure, obesity, osteoporosis and even cancer.
3. Periods of stress and illness can both introduce short term periods of reduced insulin sensitivity. In most cases, insulin sensitivity should recover once the stress or illness has passed.
Insulin sensitivity V/S Insulin resistance:
Insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity are two sides of the same coin. If you have insulin resistance, you have low insulin sensitivity. Conversely, if you are sensitive to insulin, you have low insulin resistance. While insulin resistance is harmful to your health, insulin sensitivity is beneficial.

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Insulin Metabolism

Insulin, which is secreted from the pancreatic β-cells in response to elevated glucose and amino acid levels, primarily regulate anabolic metabolism in the classic insulin-responsive tissues such as adipose, muscle, and liver. Insulin allows the cells in the muscles, fat and liver to absorb glucose that is in the blood. The glucose serves as energy to these cells, or it can be converted into fat when needed. Insulin also affects other metabolic processes, such as the breakdown of fat or protein. Insulin has a major effect on fat metabolism. After a meal, insulin causes "extra" ingested fats and glucose to be stored as fat for future use.

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Congenital Hyperinsulinism

It is a condition that causes individuals to have abnormally high levels of insulin, which is a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels. People with this condition have frequent episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). In infants and young children, these episodes are characterized by lack of energy (lethargy), irritability, or difficulty in feeding. Repeated episodes of low blood sugar increase the risk for serious complications such as breathing difficulties, seizures, intellectual disability, vision loss, brain damage, and coma.
Causes:
Congenital hyperinsulinism is caused by genetic mutations that result in inappropriate and excess insulin secretion from the beta cells of the pancreas. It is not related to anything that the mother did during pregnancy. Genetic testing can help to identify the cause of HI.
Symptom:
Congenital hyperinsulinism causes low plasma sugar (hypoglycemia).The symptoms of hypoglycemia in infants are often difficult to identify, as they can be similar to normal infant activities. Common symptoms of hypoglycemia include:
1. Irritation
2. Sleepiness
3. Lethargy
4. Excessive hunger
5. Rapid heart rate
More severe symptoms, such as seizures and coma, can occur with a prolonged low plasma sugar or an extremely low plasma sugar. Common symptoms of hypoglycemia in older children include feelings of shakiness, weakness, tiredness, confusion, and rapid heart rate.

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Impaired Glucose Metabolism

Impaired glucose tolerance means that blood glucose is raised beyond normal levels, but not high enough to warrant a diabetes diagnosis. A transition phase between normal glucose tolerance and diabetes also referred to as prediabetes. In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), the levels of blood glucose are between normal and diabetic. With IGT you face a much greater risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A condition in which blood sugar is high, but not high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism cause metabolic, neural and circulatory disturbances that may predispose to adverse cooling and related symptoms during the cold season. Weight loss and exercise may help people with IGT return their glucose levels to normal. Eating a healthy, balanced diet is a key way of treating impaired glucose tolerance.
CAUSES OF IMPAIRED GLUCOSE TOLERANCE :
Various factors increase the risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance including: being overweight or obese, having a family history of diabetes, doing little physical activity, having high blood pressure or high cholesterol and gestational diabetes. Symptoms: People who have impaired glucose tolerance often exhibit zero symptoms.

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Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland is not able to produce enough thyroid hormone. Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to "run the body's metabolism," it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism. we can help to identify the actual cause also it occurs in your body future conditions happens in your body as per genetic aspects.